Government’s Critical Role in the Expanding Digital Universe

Karen DelPrete

Karen DelPrete

By Karen Delprete, EMC

As I publish yet another blog post, I realize that I am contributing to the digital data explosion. What digital data explosion you ask?

The digital data explosion is not just the mountain of information that exists online – it’s the millions of Internet-connected smart devices that are constantly collecting and sharing content. Today’s sensors are on everything from cars to refrigerators to traffic lights, creating waves of data that simply didn’t exist a few years ago. In fact, according to the most recent Digital Universe Study released by EMC and IDC, our digital universe is doubling in size every two years. By 2020, the data we create and copy annually will equal 44 zettabytes. To put this into perspective, one zettabyte could fill 250 billion DVDs! That’s a lot of Breaking Bad episodes.

So what does this mean for government?

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Nice Shot: Healthcare Gets a Boost

Audie Hittle

Audie Hittle

By Audie Hittle, CTO Federal, EMC Isilon

I know we just finished March, but what I’m about to discuss isn’t Madness – Federal executives focused on healthcare are looking at significant advancements in their efforts to use Big Data technology to improve health management and preventive healthcare.

A new report by MeriTalk and underwritten by EMC, “The Big Data Cure,” shows what I’m talking about. Feds see the technology’s game-changing potential:

  • 63% of Federal healthcare executives say Big Data will help track and manage population health more efficiently
  • 62% say Big Data will significantly improve patient care within military health and VA systems
  • 60% say Big Data will enhance the ability to deliver preventive care

But it’s also clear that not everyone is quite ready for the Big Data Dance.

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Data Protection in the Software-Defined Government Agency

Karen DelPrete

Karen DelPrete

By Karen DelPrete, EMC Federal

As Federal agencies look for ways to become more efficient, many are turning to software-defined enterprises, as my colleague Kyle Keller so eloquently outlined in his latest blog post. And why not? By virtualizing and automating IT processes, organizations can free up valuable resources for more strategic tasks, which could save Federal agencies roughly $4.7 billion a year in productivity, according to a recent Meritalk report. Rutrell Yasin of Government Computer News points out that even though this shift may not take place over night, it has enormous potential in terms of accelerating innovation and cutting costs.

As with any shift in technology, there are a number of factors agencies need to consider, and unsurprisingly, security is at the top of the list.

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Re-Define Software-Defined

Kyle Keller

Kyle Keller

By Kyle Keller, Cloud Business Director, EMC Federal

I don’t think it comes as any shock that Federal IT is at a crossroads – straining to keep up with budget cuts, substantial data growth, and user demands.  With high expectations for application development and deployment, users are forced to go outside of traditional IT versus working with their centralized IT function – causing significant inefficiencies government-wide.

It’s time for an IT shift – away from a manual IT-centric delivery model (fitting services into a one-size-fits-all box), to an IT-as-a-Service model (identifying enterprise needs and modeling IT to meet them).  More and more, I am seeing this shift powered by the promise of the Software-Defined Enterprise.

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Cloud Choice: It’s a Consumption Model, Not a Destination

Kyle Keller

Kyle Keller

By Kyle Keller, Cloud Business Director, EMC Federal

Most of us in federal IT realize that rarely (if ever) does a single solution meet the needs of application requirements across the enterprise. In the context of cloud, finding the right consumption and delivery model for applications needs to be based on functionality requirements, financial analysis, and overall risk profile.

In other words, cloud is not a “one size fits all” proposition. Many organizations pursue a “cloud of clouds” approach, leveraging multiple cloud environments to most efficiently deliver IT services. Some applications have security requirements that demand a private cloud infrastructure, while others are more conducive to an off-premises public cloud. After these decisions are made, based on risk, cost, and performance factors, the challenge becomes stitching together both internal and external cloud resources in a hybrid infrastructure capable of delivering a cohesive service catalog.

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