One Stop Cloud Shop: EMC Adds Managed Cloud Services For Federal Agencies With Virtustream Acquisition

Barry Morris

Barry Morris

Vice President, EMC Federal Division
Barry Morris, Vice President of EMC’s Federal Division, is responsible for general division management, providing leadership and vision to the Federal team, government contractors and partners, and Federal systems integrators. In this role, he is dedicated to helping agencies redefine IT in a more agile, trusted, and cost-efficient way. Morris brings 30 years of experience driving sales to the Federal government, and expanding coverage into the state and local government, education, and medical markets.

Good news for our Federal customers: EMC recently announced plans to acquire Virtustream as our new managed cloud services business. With the addition of Virtustream, EMC completes the industry’s most comprehensive hybrid cloud portfolio to support all applications, all workloads, and all cloud models.

New Managed Cloud and Services Capabilities

Virtustream brings a managed cloud software and services capability to the EMC portfolio, and will be incorporated into the Federation Enterprise Hybrid Cloud Solution – an on-premise private cloud offering that provides on-ramps to public cloud services such as VMware vCloud Air.

Additionally, in a recent InformationWeek article, writer Charles Babcock noted that Virtustream has a specialty in hosting SAP applications – trusted to migrate, run, and manage these mission-critical applications in the cloud.

By adding Virtustream, EMC will be enabled to act as a single source for customers’ hybrid cloud infrastructure and service needs – providing customers the capability to move their entire application portfolio into a cloud environment.

Cloud Acceleration Ahead

At EMC, we know Federal agencies need real innovation to transform IT service delivery and most effectively meet changing Federal mission requirements.

But, together with innovation, you need trusted, tested, and resilient solutions. Virtustream fits the bill – Forrester ranked Virtustream as one of only two “Leaders” in the hosted private cloud solutions market. Gartner has recognized Virtustream in the Gartner Magic Quadrant for Cloud Infrastructure as a Service — one of the few independent companies to reach this status worldwide in public cloud IaaS.

In addition, Virtustream integrates a comprehensive defense-in-depth security model and governance solution, validated by Virtustream’s highest ranking in the area of security and compliance in Gartner’s “Critical Capabilities for Public Cloud Infrastructure as a Service” report.

We know cloud computing – and specifically hybrid cloud models — are fundamental to Federal IT transformation – and Virtustream has just what we need to get there.

In fact, our chairman and CEO, Joe Tucci, said it best, “We could not be more delighted that Virtustream will be joining the EMC Federation family. It’s a game changer.”

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FITARA in the Firing Line

Barry Morris

Barry Morris

Vice President, EMC Federal Division
Barry Morris, Vice President of EMC’s Federal Division, is responsible for general division management, providing leadership and vision to the Federal team, government contractors and partners, and Federal systems integrators. In this role, he is dedicated to helping agencies redefine IT in a more agile, trusted, and cost-efficient way. Morris brings 30 years of experience driving sales to the Federal government, and expanding coverage into the state and local government, education, and medical markets.

Federal leaders recognize that now, more than ever, effective management and oversight for IT programs is vital for Federal mission success.

The Federal IT Acquisition and Reform Act (FITARA) aims to give Federal CIOs more authority and greater responsibility for producing IT programs that deliver as promised.

The challenge is that Federal IT has never been more decentralized – with mission owners scoping requirements and selecting solutions – sometimes without input from central IT. Cloud services make it easy.

The result is lack of integration with enterprise systems (siloed data), compromised security (think e-mailgate), and enormous inefficiencies due to duplicating everything.

Give the People What They Want

What agencies really need is more and better alignment between central IT and the mission owners. But, with resources strangled by legacy systems – the opportunity for innovation, and progress – is challenging, and will require more than giving CIOs greater authority – although that’s a good first step. The CIO needs the ability to deliver commodity IT services efficiently, at the speed of the mission, and still have some time and money left over for creating new solutions.

A Tale of Two Clouds

As a Federal IT community, where do we go from here? Part of the solution has to be in the cloud.

But, it does not have to be the cloud that delivers shadow IT, compromises security, and removes control. It can be a secure enterprise hybrid cloud that enables the CIO to deliver IT-as-a-Service, automate, and take as much pain out of the process as possible.

This cloud gives mission owners the control to select what they need and implement as quickly as their mission demands. Additionally, the CIO retains control over the service offerings, the infrastructure, and security.

FITARA is bringing much-needed attention to Federal IT reform. We all know why – but now need to give real thought to the “how.”

Blurred Lines – A Theme for the Public and Private Sectors

Amit Yoran

Amit Yoran

President at RSA

I recently had an opportunity to speak to a group of cyber security leaders from across industry and government who had gathered at the Army Cyber Institute in West Point, N.Y. Much of the day was focused on the importance of public sector and private industry working together to defeat our common cyber adversaries. My remarks, however, focused on just how hard that collaboration will be under current circumstances. One thing holding back meaningful progress to that end is a profound lack of transparency.

Each side has different objectives, agendas, and approaches, leading to the Kafkaesque result we find ourselves in today. Without better defined roles and responsibilities, it is unlikely we will ever develop appropriate expectations of one another. It’s even less likely we will develop the necessary sense of trust, a foundational ingredient to constructive partnership.

And so, here are a few areas where we should “un-blur” the lines:

  • Intelligence gathering, while controversial, is an inherently governmental function. It is imperative that intelligence efforts be clearly separated from information assurance efforts, and appropriate barriers be taken to assure that the latter isn’t hampered by national efforts of the former. To be certain, the United States may have great cyber skill in the intel community, and intel can and should inform information assurance efforts, but there can be no confusion about authorities, responsibilities, or purpose of use in national information defensive efforts
  • Similarly, government, intelligence, and defense communities cannot and should not be in the business of defending private sector networks and systems. That is a slippery slope, creating moral hazard for the private industry’s network defenders and an impossible task for the government
  • Legislation and regulation are critical governmental authorities and responsibilities. While these areas risk unintended consequences, there is greater risk in inaction. Such efforts are not in lieu of free markets, but rather to help achieve balance. Among these is the need for greater transparency, especially into breaches, among other things, whether breaches affect personally identifiable information or not

Private businesses, as the owners and operators of so much of the national infrastructure, are responsible for securing it. Industry needs to take responsibility for its own cyber defenses, and not abdicate that responsibility to the government. Today’s reality is that technology risk is business risk!

Developing critical security technologies and driving innovation is an area of significant private investment. Industry needs to evolve its strategies and tools. For too long, private enterprises have settled for iterative baby steps in innovation while our adversaries stride past us.

Companies must also take an active role in the cyber strategy and policy debate. The results of those debates affect us and indeed, the whole world. Sitting on the sidelines wringing hands is behind us.

I don’t profess to have all the answers, but it’s important to move this idle dialogue forward. Clear roles and responsibilities are prerequisites to establishing trust and meaningful partnership.

This post was originally published on our sister blog Reflections, where senior leaders at EMC blog regularly on trends in information technology.

Is Your Agency Ready for the Information Generation?

Barry Morris

Barry Morris

Vice President, EMC Federal Division
Barry Morris, Vice President of EMC’s Federal Division, is responsible for general division management, providing leadership and vision to the Federal team, government contractors and partners, and Federal systems integrators. In this role, he is dedicated to helping agencies redefine IT in a more agile, trusted, and cost-efficient way. Morris brings 30 years of experience driving sales to the Federal government, and expanding coverage into the state and local government, education, and medical markets.

EMC recently partnered with research firm Vanson Bourne to explore the changing expectations of the Information Generation, defined as, “a growing community of digital citizens connected to a global network that puts the world’s information at their fingertips.”

These individuals want faster, round-the-clock access to services; and crave more personalized digitized experiences they can access anytime, anywhere, from their smart device.

The Federal government recognizes these trends. And, with efforts like 18F, is working to meet the new expectations of the Information Generation. This said, more change, and more opportunity is ahead.

By 2020, the Internet will connect seven billion people on the planet, 30 billion devices, and 10 million businesses. As explained in the Information Generation report, all of this points to an even more data-driven future, marked by five fundamental shifts:

  • The Information Economy: People will sell, donate, and trade their information
  • Networked Systems: Inanimate objects will be more responsive and connected
  • Augmented Decision Making: Enhanced by artificial intelligence
  • Multi-Sensory Communication: More data will be communicated through the senses
  • Privacy-Enhancing Technology: Individuals will regain more control over their privacy

To support these shifts, agencies need new, agile infrastructures that allow them to store, protect, analyze, and share data more easily and more cost effectively than in the past. They will need secure hybrid cloud infrastructures and data lakes that enable them to connect enterprise data – and gain new insights.

Earlier this year, I joined EMC because I’m excited about the opportunity to help the Federal government realize the opportunity for progress, and I look forward to working together with our Federal team, partners, and customers as we take the next steps.

Interested in learning more about the Information Generation? Read more here.

If a Picture’s Worth a Thousand Words, How About 30 Million Pictures?

Audie Hittle

Audie Hittle

Federal CTO, Emerging Technologies Division, EMC Corporation

Picture this – there is one surveillance camera for every 10 people in the U.S. – that’s close to 30 million cameras, and growing. As Feds experience a swelling flood of video data, the question looms: How can they manage, analyze, and secure it – unlocking insights to protect our nation?

To help out, we teamed up with MeriTalk’s Bill Glanz to explore the impact of the video data deluge in EMC’s newest video blog, “Focal Point: Video Data Explosion.”

What better way to explore the video surveillance landscape than through a video blog?

The Big Picture

The video surveillance market is expected to grow to $26B in 2018, according to market research by IHS Technologies, and who watches move TV than Uncle Sam? One thing is increasingly clear – video data is invaluable to agencies. According to MeriTalk’s new study, “The Video Vortex,” a resounding 99% of Feds say video is key to preventing crime, theft, and terrorism over the next five years – which shows just how crucial it is that Feds glean as much insight as possible from their video data.

Now here’s the scary part – despite its importance to national security, 54% of Federal video surveillance data currently goes unanalyzed. Imagine the possibilities if Feds analyzed it all – facial recognition, anomaly detection, traffic monitoring, and the list goes on…

What’s Blocking Their View?

MeriTalk asked the Feds, and they point to IT infrastructure as a key barrier to full data analysis. Right now, 91% say they need increased storage, 89% say increased computing power, and 84% say increased personnel – all important items on the Federal shopping list.

Another key component to the video data solution? Collaboration. 79% of Feds believe increased collaboration between physical security and IT will lead to greater video analysis – meaning more data insights. But, there’s another barrier. 76% of physical security managers currently see video surveillance programs as a collaboration – but few IT managers agree (just 33%). To move forward, everyone needs to be on the same page.

Light at the End of the Tunnel

These statistics provide great insight, but what’s a Fed to do when their agency can’t handle current video volumes, much less the data deluge that’s expected to come down the pike?

Don’t let your data headache turn into a migraine. Join us on June 11 at 1:30 p.m. ET for a complimentary webinar to take a deeper dive into “The Video Vortex” findings. You’ll get direct insight from Feds and walk away with new ideas on how to approach the video data influx. Then checkout EMC’s video surveillance core and edge solutions including the Isilon Scale-Out Data Lake and the EMC VNX-VSS100 for simple, efficient, and flexible options.